FT-IR Spectroscopy

Feb 11, 2011
Application Notebook
In the manufacturing process, it frequently becomes important to determine if metal parts are clean or are sufficiently lubricated with oil. Infrared analysis of small, flat pieces can be readily carried out by in-compartment grazing angle specular reflectance.
Feb 11, 2011
Application Notebook
The application of FT-IR spectroscopy in quality assurance and quality control has largely been limited to laboratory efforts — bringing the samples to the instrument located on a benchtop in a lab. The advent of handheld analyzers such as A2 Technologies' Exoscan system, enables FT-IR to move from the lab to analyses at the sample site.
Feb 11, 2011
Spectroscopy
Attenuated total internal reflection Fourier-transform infrared imaging confirms the presence of drug components in illicit tablets.
Feb 11, 2011
Application Notebook
By Spectroscopy Editors
Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometers provide spectra in less time than scanning systems, but water vapor and/or CO2 in the sample chamber leads to additional peaks that may obscure important information. These interferences can be eliminated by sealing the sample chamber and purging with dry, CO2 free air (purge gas) or nitrogen for a short period of time.
Jan 01, 2011
Spectroscopy
The authors discuss the concept of the explosive bouquet and its application to the spectroscopic detection of explosive compounds such as C4.
Sep 01, 2010
Application Notebook
A2 Technologies' Exoscan hand-held FTIR (Figure 1) is increasingly being used by researchers involved in the geosciences for analysis of rocks, minerals, and soil for a broad variety of applications.
Sep 01, 2010
Application Notebook
FT-NIR analyzer to perform in-line determination of tablet coating thickness during spray coating.
Sep 01, 2010
Application Notebook
Kidney stones are complex, biological matrices often composed of mixtures of minerals and organic matter.
Sep 01, 2010
Application Notebook
Diamond is generally not used as a multiple reflection ATR element due to its strong lattice bands around 2200 cm-1M.
Aug 01, 2010
Special Issues
Characterization of trace evidence is an invaluable asset to the forensic scientist in solving crimes. In particular, the characterization needs to be specific enough so that the identification of material collected at a crime scene can be identified forcefully with material collected from a suspect's environment. Colored microscopic fibers can be discovered easily at a crime scene and collected for analysis. The question is what physical tool can be used to characterize these fibers. Fourier transform–infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is a well-established method for characterizing trace evidence. In this article, FT-IR, FT-Raman, and dispersive Raman spectra of a series of prepared fibers will be evaluated for their information content.
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