Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy

Jun 18, 2012
Spectroscopy
By Spectroscopy Editors
Bernhard Lendl and Cosima Koch of the Vienna University of Technology have developed a new method for on-line monitoring of fermentations using mid-infrared spectroscopy.
May 11, 2012
Spectroscopy
By Spectroscopy Editors
Part of a new podcast series presented in collaboration with the Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies (FACSS), in connection with SciX 2012 ? the Great Scientific Exchange, the North American conference (39th Annual) of FACSS.
Feb 01, 2012
Spectroscopy
The series on classical least squares continues with a comparison of experimental results and theoretical expectations.
Feb 01, 2012
Spectroscopy
By Spectroscopy Editors
By combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy, one can attain spatial resolution improvements of two orders of magnitude over traditional IR spectroscopy.
Feb 01, 2012
Spectroscopy
By Spectroscopy Editors
A review of the application of IR spectroscopy for the analysis of color components in winemaking, and the contribution of spectral preprocessing to improve the multivariate calibration.
Dec 01, 2011
Spectroscopy
By Spectroscopy Editors
Case studies involving fouling and product quality illustrate the effective use of this method.
Oct 01, 2011
Spectroscopy
By Spectroscopy Editors
How can you navigate the maze of choices for detecting molecular vibrations with mid-infrared (IR), near IR (NIR), and visible (Raman)? Understanding what is being measured, how it is measured, and the advantages and disadvantages of each technique, will help.
Oct 01, 2011
Spectroscopy
Continued discussion of the classical least squares approach to calibration, with a focus on the reconstruction of mixtures
Aug 01, 2011
Special Issues
By Spectroscopy Editors
Liquid chromatography–mid infrared spectroscopy (LC-IR) is a powerful tool for copolymer analysis. This article describes an automated, self-regulating solvent-removal interface that produces continuous transmission spectra from the deposited, solvent-free, solid-phase chromatogram.
Aug 01, 2011
Special Issues
By Spectroscopy Editors
In recent years, attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy has become the preferred method for many routine infrared (IR) measurements. However, the simplicity of the technique has made it available to users who may not be aware of some effects that significantly influence the appearance of ATR spectra. This results in changes to the relative intensities of different absorption bands. The aim of this article is to explain the origin of these effects and to provide examples. In particular, it will focus on those effects that are not evident from inspection of the spectra.
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