Market Profile: IMS x MS - - Spectroscopy
 Home   Mass Spectrometry   ICP-MS   Infrared   FT-IR   UV-Vis   Raman   NMR   X-Ray   Fluorescence  
Home
Magazine
Issue Archive
Subscribe/Renew
Special Issues
Reprints
The Application Notebook
Current Issue
Archive
Submission Guidelines
Training
SpecAcademy
E-solutions
Digital Edition
Subscribe to the Digital Edition
The Wavelength
Subcribe to The Wavelength
Subscribe to the MS E-news
Resources
Market Profiles
Information for Authors
SpecTube
Webcasts
Advertiser services
Contact Us
Columns
Atomic Perspectives
Chemometrics in Spectroscopy
Focus on Quality
Laser and Optics Interface
Mass Spectrometry Forum
The Baseline
Molecular Spectroscopy Workbench

Market Profile: IMS x MS

Spectroscopy
Volume 24, Issue 2



Mass spectrometry (MS) is a broadly used analytical technique that is often combined with some form of chromatography to provide a second dimension of separation. However, vendors recently have begun incorporating ion mobility separation (IMS) into high-end LC–MS instruments, thus providing an additional level of ion separation.

In mass spectrometry, analyte ions are separated based upon their mass-to-charge ratio. IMS, in contrast, separates ions based upon their effective size. While IMS is generally considered a poor-man's mass spectrometer, combining the two techniques into a single system provides complementary dimensions of separation, which is proving to be very useful for very dirty and complex samples. This has made IMS MS very popular in biotechnology laboratories, as well as related CRO, academic, and government laboratories.

Ion mobility technology thus far has been incorporated as a filtering device on some Thermo Scientific triple quadrupole LC–MS systems, and as an actual separation device on Waters' high-end Q-TOF LC–MS systems. The technique is also being incorporated into some portable mass spectrometers for security applications. SDi estimates the combined market for the technique, which includes initial systems equipped with the technology, and aftermarket and service for system upgrades, to be around $40 million, and growing at a solid double-digit annual rate.

The foregoing data were based upon SDi's market analysis and perspectives report entitled Mass Spectrometry, February 2008. For more information, contact Stuart Press, Vice President – Strategic Analysis, Strategic Directions International, Inc., 6242 Westchester Parkway, Suite 100, Los Angeles, CA 90045, (310) 641-4982, fax: (310) 641-8851, http://www.strategic-directions.com/.

Rate This Article
Your original vote has been tallied and is included in the ratings results.
View our top pages
Average rating for this page is: 5
Headlines from LCGC North America and Chromatography Online
Is 2D LC Ready for Prime Time Analysis?
The Benefits of Okra
Automated SPE and Cleanup for PCBs in Human Serum
UCT EU - Determination of Pesticide Residues in Tea: An AOAC Collaborative Study
The Analytical Science Behind Winemaking
Source: Spectroscopy,
Click here