Agilent Atomic Offers Absorption Lamp Recycling Program in North America - - Spectroscopy
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Agilent Atomic Offers Absorption Lamp Recycling Program in North America

Special Issues

Agilent Technologies (Santa Clara, California) is offering a recycling program that enables customers in the United States and Canada to return used atomic absorption lamps. Under this new program, laboratories are invited to return used hollow cathode lamps for recycling.

The recycling service is offered through a collaboration with Veolia Environmental Services of North America (Chicago, Illinois). The purchase price covers provision of approved recycling containers and shipping costs enabling customers to return a maximum of five lamps for recycling. Recycling containers are United Nations-related and U.S. Department of Transportation-approved. Customers may access compliance documentation online, including a certificate of recycling that details specific waste types and quantities received.

The program enables Agilent customers to be in compliance with state and federal regulations controlling waste disposal. It also allows for the safe breakdown of the lamps and separation into glass, metal, plastic, and electronic waste for recycling or disposal as appropriate.

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