ICP-MS

Oct 01, 2006
Special Issues
By Spectroscopy Editors
The analysis of edible oils and fats by inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) utilizing direct injection after dilution with kerosene is described. Sample preparation was performed according to EN ISO 661 (1) and ISO 10540-3 (2). The accuracy was investigated using the AOCS reference sample, "Trace Metals in Soybean Oil" (3) and by spike recovery measurements using commercial sunflower oil. The analysis requirements for sensitivity, precision, and accuracy were met. This article includes line selection, detection limits, and accuracy studies.
Oct 01, 2006
Special Issues
By Spectroscopy Editors
The use of fertilizers is important to increase crop yields in soils that are being used for agricultural purposes. However, in order to maximize plant growth, it is also absolutely essential to know how the crops are using the nutrients in the soil. This process is commonly referred to as a fertility management program, where many soil samples are taken over a predefined area of the land and analyzed for various components such as pH, organic matter, and trace element nutrients. This article describes how a soil testing laboratory in the midwest has developed a method to analyze up to 3500 soil samples per day for 11 trace metals, using inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectroscopy. It will focus on the soil sampling procedure together with the sample preparation requirements for this high workload environment. The instrumental analytical procedure will be described in greater detail, particularly how the measurement protocol and sampling process are optimized to cope with such extreme..
Oct 01, 2006
Special Issues
By Spectroscopy Editors
Interactive dedicated tools have been developed to facilitate the use of multiline analysis in inductively coupled plasma–atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) with emphases on multiline selection and on statistics for rejection of possible outliers. The aim is to take full benefit of the available information when using a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector–based instrument and to enhance the accuracy of the results. Determination of Cu in steel will be used to illustrate the potential of the tools.
Oct 01, 2006
Special Issues
By Spectroscopy Editors
Accurate determination of trace Cl, Br, and I is important in industries such as petrochemical refining, chemical manufacturing, biomedical and nutritional supplement manufacturing, and environmental analysis. Until recently, it was thought that the halogen elements could not be determined effectively by inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES); however, with recent advances in spectrometer and detector design, these elements are now readily determined. In fact, ICP-OES offers many advantages for the measurement of Cl, Br, and I. These include ease-of-use and the ability to test for other elements simultaneously, along with good sensitivity, precision, and accuracy. This article describes the measurement of chlorine in tissue and oil samples as well as the measurement of bromine in plastics and electronic materials where the solids were sampled using laser ablation.
May 01, 2006
Spectroscopy
In this article, the authors discuss the basic premises that underlie the science of spectrochemistry, which has been humorously referred to as a "black art" by some.
May 01, 2006
Special Issues
Here, the authors discuss a multielement method for the simultaneous determination of inorganic As, Cr, and Se species in potable waters using a HPLC system coupled to a dynamic reaction cell indusctively coupled plasma mass spectrometer.
Feb 01, 2006
Spectroscopy
The element selenium plays three distinct roles in biological processes, functioning in turn as a toxicant, a chemopreventive agent, and a heavy metal antagonist. This article discusses current research associated with each role, and how ICP-MS can be employed to better understand and utilize selenium's properties.
Jan 01, 2006
Spectroscopy
By Spectroscopy Editors
This report demonstrates that it is possible to meet and exceed EPA "statement of work" requirements using ICP-MS.
Nov 02, 2005
Special Issues
By Spectroscopy Editors
As the demand for accurate soil analysis increases, agriculturalists will need faster, less expensive analytical methods to determine the type and amount of fertilizer required for optimum crop growth. Today, inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) is the most commonly employed technique for the determination of nutrient elements in fertilizers, while combustion analysis is used for nitrogen. Until recently, ICP-OES could not achieve the accuracy and precision necessary to measure nitrogen due to the elevated background effects caused by atmospheric nitrogen, as well as the inherent stability limitations associated with older instrument designs. This paper describes a new ICP-OES configuration and sample introduction system designed to greatly reduce nitrogen backgrounds and thereby facilitate nitrogen determinations by ICP-OES. Furthermore, the nitrogen determinations are carried out concurrently with the other nutrient elements previously reported by ICP-OES without..
Nov 02, 2005
Special Issues
By Spectroscopy Editors
Sample introduction can be a significant source of random and systematic error in the measurement of samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and ICP mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) systems.The considerations made in selecting a liquid introduction system include dissolved solids content, suspended solids presence, presence of hydrofluoric acid or caustic, detection limit requirements, precision requirements, sample load requirements, sample size limitations, and operating budget. The analyst is left with the task of choosing the best introduction components.This article discusses the key components of a typical liquid sample introduction system for inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, and offers troubleshooting tips for problems commonly encountered by practitioners.
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