EAS 2018: Analytical Solutions to the World's Problems

Oct 03, 2018

The theme of the 2018 Eastern Analytical Symposium and Exposition is “Analytical Solutions to the World’s Problems.” The EAS has always been about problem solving. This year, we focus on problems that affect the world. These problems affect our families, our health, our homes, our environment, and our planet, no matter where we live or work. Sometimes, by our best efforts, we solve one problem, only to create another. The analytical community typically is asked to respond to such difficult problems. The community has always been innovative and creative in addressing the needs of our employers, our businesses, our communities, and the world. We discover new entities, create novel instruments, define scientific processes, and provide critical analytical services to tackle even the most complicated problems and challenges. 

The EAS program this year offers a multitude of analytical solutions to the problems of our world, whether societally created, technologically or industrially generated, or just the results of human curiosity and activity. Presentations on analysis in pharmaceutical, environmental, clinical, conservation, food, forensic, regulatory, proteomic, and health science contexts are planned, with experts in each of these fields offering state-of-the-art solutions.

Sustainability

We have started to make EAS a sustainable green conference with some specific green initiatives this year. With initiatives such as electronic posters and reduction of pages in the final program (both of which save trees), we have begun to change our carbon footprint. Our keynote speaker, John Warner, the founder of the Warner Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry, will present on green chemistry technologies, and lead our efforts at sustainability. 

Our plenary lecture will be given by Linda P. McGown, the William Weightman Walker Chair of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and the winner of the 2018 EAS Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Field of Analytical Chemistry. The EAS award this year is given in recognition of McGown’s solutions to problems in the fields of separation science, the analysis of DNA sequences, and her development of aptamers as potential pharmaceutical substances. We also offer an early morning breakfast lecture by Mark Schure, of the Theoretical Separation Science Laboratory on the current state 2D liquid chromatography.

Overall Conference Program

In addition to these focused lectures, the program committee has finalized a wide variety of invited and contributed sessions that span the gamut of analytical chemistry. Whether it’s spectroscopy, separation science, forensics, pharmaceutical analysis, environment, food science, or cultural heritage, there are session with talks by international leaders in analytical chemistry. Of particular interest to Spectroscopy readers, there are 12 sessions on spectroscopy, including one celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Society for Applied Spectroscopy (SAS) and a session organized by the New York–New Jersey division of SAS. For more information, check out the program at the EAS website: www.eas.org.

Awards

EAS has long recognized the efforts of analysts, and this year is no exception. In 2018, the Eastern Analytical Symposium & Exposition is pleased to honor the following recipients of the 2018 EAS Award for Outstanding Achievements in:

The Fields of Analytical Chemistry: Linda P. McGown of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Magnetic Resonance: Clare Grey of the University of Cambridge

Mass Spectrometry: Yinsheng Wang of the University of California, Riverside

Vibrational Spectroscopy: Stephen P. Cramer of the University of California, Davis.

In addition to these field-based awards, we are pleased to present the EAS Young Investigator Award to Kerri Pratt of the University of Michigan.

Also, the EAS is pleased to provide a forum for these society-based awards:

NY/NJ SAS Gold Medal: Igor Lednev of the University at Albany

New York Microscopical Society’s Ernst Abbe Award: Peter R. De Forest of John Jay College

American Microchemical Society’s Benedetti-Pichler Award: Ryan C. Bailey of the University of Michigan.

 

Posters in New Electronic Format

As mentioned earlier, this year EAS is instituting a new format for poster presentations. Rather than being presented on paper, all posters will be displayed electronically. This approach will allow for more interactive flow of information, as well provide a green alternative to the usual paper posters seen at most meetings.

Short Courses

For those who want to hone their expertise in various areas, the EAS has offered short courses designed to help the practicing analyst to develop new skills and enhance knowledge. They are specifically designed to help analysts keep current with best practices and new techniques. This year there are 36 courses that range from instructions on separations to general courses on troubleshooting and process analysis. You are sure to find topics that will provide essential knowledge and enhance your career in analysis. The instructors are experts in their specialties, and they communicate the important, and sometimes esoteric, nature of techniques and problems encountered in everyday laboratory work. The complete list of EAS short courses, descriptions, and schedule is available on our website at www.eas.org.

Exposition

Of course, EAS is well-known for the exposition, and this year we continue the tradition of providing attendees with the latest innovations in analytical technology. More than 80 exhibitors have already signed on to be a part of the action. So, whether your need is specific to a particular problem, or you want to learn what the latest innovations are, you will find it at the exposition.

Join us at the Crowne Plaza Princeton Conference Center in Plainsboro, New Jersey, November 11–14, 2018 to see everything that EAS has to offer. 

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