Market Profile: Molecular Spectroscopy Aftermarket and Service

April 1, 2006

Spectroscopy

Spectroscopy, Spectroscopy-04-01-2006, Volume 21, Issue 4

The worldwide market for aftermarket products and service for laboratory molecular spectroscopy was worth more than three-quarters of a billion dollars in 2005, representing quite a significant market in its own right. The aftermarket, which accounts for the majority of this market, consists largely of similar products across the varying molecular spectroscopy techniques. Demand for service is for the most part dependent upon the complexity and cost of the initial systems.

The worldwide market for aftermarket products and service for laboratory molecular spectroscopy was worth more than three-quarters of a billion dollars in 2005, representing quite a significant market in its own right. The aftermarket, which accounts for the majority of this market, consists largely of similar products across the varying molecular spectroscopy techniques. Demand for service is for the most part dependent upon the complexity and cost of the initial systems.

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) accounts for more than a third of the aftermarket and service demand. Although the aftermarket for NMR is quite large, consisting mostly of probes and cryogenic gases, demand for service is nearly as big, due to the much higher cost and complexity of a typical NMR system than other types of molecular spectroscopy. Service demand for infrared is also quite large, due to the large installed base of FT-IR instruments and infrared microscopes.

UV–vis, which accounts for more than a quarter of the aftermarket and service demand, actually has a larger aftermarket than does NMR, due primarily to consumables such as test kits. The large installed base of UV–vis instruments also contributes significantly to the large demand for aftermarket products and services, despite their simplicity and low initial system costs.

The other four categories of molecular spectroscopy techniques are significantly smaller markets, and contribute to less than a quarter of all demand for the aftermarket and service. Common aftermarket products include replacement optical components, replacement excitation sources such as lasers, fiber optics, and software upgrades.

The foregoing data were extracted from SDi's market analysis and perspectives report entitled 8th Edition Global Assessment Report: The Laboratory Life Science and Analytical Instrument Industry, June 2004. For more information, contact Stuart Press, Senior Consultant, Strategic Directions International, Inc., 6242 Westchester Parkway, Suite 100, Los Angeles, CA 90045, (310) 641-4982, fax: (310) 641-8851, www.strategic-directions.com.

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