Application Notebook-09-01-2008

Application Notebook

Secondary Structure, Stability, and Aggregation Determination of Protein in Solution Using Fourier Transform–Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR)

September 01, 2008

Molecular Spectroscopy

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The form and frequency of the amide I band, assigned to the C=O stretching vibration within peptide bonds, is informative and predictive of peptide or protein secondary structure. Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy analysis of protein secondary (2°) structure is particularly useful in peptide, protein, or enzyme formulation, widespread in the pharmaceutical and biofuel production industries.

From the Publishers

September 01, 2008

Deparments: From the Publishers

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This September issue of The Application Notebook should be reaching our audience just as the busiest time of the year ramps up in the world of spectroscopy.

Complete Analysis of Carbon Black–Containing Rubbers

September 01, 2008

Molecular Spectroscopy

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Carbon black rubbers often contain multiple components, but are strongly absorbing in the infrared. The combination of Ge ATR, Advanced ATR correction and multi-component searching permits the full analysis of these important materials.

Raman Quantitative Calibration Stability for a Sample Mixture

September 01, 2008

Molecular Spectroscopy

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The simplicity of Raman spectroscopy provides an ideal method for the quantitative determination of liquid mixtures.

Miniature NIR: Improved Accuracy, Cost Savings

September 01, 2008

Molecular Spectroscopy

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With gas and diesel fuel prices rising, there is an increasing need to monitor online quality control and blending mixtures. The benefits include improved accuracy in blending mixtures, solid state reliability, lifetime calibration and fraud avoidance.

Monitoring Cure Characteristics of a Thermoset Epoxy by ATR/FT-IR

September 01, 2008

Molecular Spectroscopy

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Some ATR / FTIR applications require a high performance, robust, and versatile accessory to accommodate difficult materials or high temperatures. As an example, the curing of a thermoset epoxy is evaluated and results are discussed.

Simplifying Measurement of D/H and 18O/16O Isotopic Ratios from Liquid Water by WS-CRDS

September 01, 2008

Atomic Spectroscopy

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Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy combines the real-time speed and turnkey simplicity of optical spectroscopy with the precision (

Raman Microscopic Analysis of Grain Kernels

September 01, 2008

Molecular Spectroscopy

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Ultrafast and Automated Confocal Raman Imaging on Large Samples

September 01, 2008

Molecular Spectroscopy

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In the Life Sciences, Materials Research, and Nanotechnology, obtaining as much information as possible about the chemical and structural composition of a sample is essential. Confocal Raman Microscopy can play an important role in the nondestructive characterization and imaging of chemical properties while requiring only minimal, if any sample preparation. Systematic and routine research tasks with repetitive experiments or a large number of measurement points, as well as high-level quality control can benefit from an automated instrument.

Economical Maya2000 Pro Extends to VUV

September 01, 2008

Mass Spectrometry

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Spectral measurements down to 153 nm can be achieved easily and economically with the high-sensitivity Maya2000 Pro with Extra-Deep-UV Option. Nitrogen purging of the spectrometer helps to mitigate water and oxygen absorption in the vacuum ultraviolet.

Microelectroluminescence Characterization of Single Quantum Dots

September 01, 2008

Molecular Spectroscopy

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Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) can be used as nonclassical light sources with applications in next-generation quantum communication and computing. Electrically pumped QDs are all solid-state sources of single photons that are not limited by Poisson statistics (1). Recent work by the group of Dieter Bimberg at Technische Universität-Berlin has demonstrated the selective pumping of a single InAs QD with emission from a single exciton (1–3).

Optimized Long-Term Stability for Enhanced Laboratory Productivity with ICP

September 01, 2008

Atomic Spectroscopy

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The factors that affect the long-term stability of ICP instruments are discussed and details of the performance of the Thermo Scientific iCAP 6000 Series for extended period analyses are given.

Advantages of Silicon Drift Detectors

September 01, 2008

Atomic Spectroscopy

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The availability of new silicon drift detectors (SDD) allows for more precise measurements in less acquisition time. SDDs are often praised for their excellent energy resolution, but it is their increased throughput that make them ideal for many industrial applications. Due to the detector's smaller capacitance, a much shorter peaking time is used in the shaping amplifier without sacrificing resolution. This dramatically increases the throughput of the system. Compared with a conventional Si-PIN detector where the peaking time is as long as 25 ms, the drift detector operates at 1.6 ms, thereby increasing throughput from 10,000 counts per second to over 100,000. This advantage can be used in two primary ways.