Novel Instrumentation for and Applications of Raman Spectroscopy

October 15, 2009

Raman spectroscopy, which is used to study vibrational, rotational, and other low-frequency modes in a system, provides vibrational information specific to a molecule?s chemical bonds and symmetry. This session will discuss topics such as Raman microscopy for 3-D depth profiling, correcting undesired optical coupling in fiber-optic probes, using Raman spectroscopy for bacterial identification, and sunscreen analysis using UV resonance Raman spectroscopy.

Raman spectroscopy, which is used to study vibrational, rotational, and other low-frequency modes in a system, provides vibrational information specific to a molecule’s chemical bonds and symmetry. This session will discuss topics such as Raman microscopy for 3-D depth profiling, correcting undesired optical coupling in fiber-optic probes, using Raman spectroscopy for bacterial identification, and sunscreen analysis using UV resonance Raman spectroscopy.

The first presentation in the session will be given by Emily Smith of Iowa State University and US DOE, Ames Laboratory, and is titled “Variable Angle Total Internal Reflection Raman Microscopy.” Smith will discuss three-dimensional Raman spectroscopy depth profiling using an instrument based on a traditional optical microscope platform and modified with beam steering optics to vary the angle of incident light on a prism–sample interface.

The next talk, to be delivered by Kathryn A. Dooley of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Michigan, is titled “Detection and Correction of Coupling Errors in Optical Fiber Bundles for Collection of Raman Spectra” and will cover a novel method for correcting undesired optical coupling in fiber-optic probes caused by diffraction or monochromatic aberrations and by optical cross-talk among tightly packed fibers.

Janie Dubois of Malvern Instruments will present the next talk, “A Targeted Approach to Bacterial Identification: A Combined Measurement Using Raman Spectroscopy and Cellular Morpology.” This method uses high-throughput morphological classification to prescreen a sample using shape and size. The method reportedly produces a simultaneous physical and chemical classification model that is superior to either microscopy or Raman spectroscopy alone.

The fourth presentation in the session, “Elucidating Iron Cluster Composition in Zeolites Through Comparison of Loading Technique,” will be delivered by Dana Sauter of Northwestern University. The presentation will discuss the investigation of iron complexes formed within zeolite pores and the types of iron-oxygen complexes formed using various catalyst loading methods.

The penultimate presentation will be given by Sulayman Oladepo from the University of Alberta and is titled “UV Resonance Raman Spectroscopy as a Robust Spectroscopic Tool for Probing Sunscreen Formulations.” Oladepo will discuss the in-situ analysis of sunscreen formulations using UV resonance Raman spectroscopy without prior sample preparation.

The final presentation of this session will be delivered by Xiaoyun Chen of The Dow Chemical Company and is titled “Discovery and Characterization of Tetraalkylammonium Polybromides with Raman Spectroscopy.” Chen will discuss the collection of Raman spectra from the polybromides in solid, liquid, and solution form.