The Application Notebook 02-01-2021

Application Notebook

Turn to page 43 of the PDF for The Application Notebook.

Non-Destructive FT-IR Measurements via Diffuse Reflection Sampling

February 01, 2021

Molecular Spectroscopy

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For analysis of non-particulate solids, the diffuse reflection sampling technique may offer an easy, non-destructive method for mid-infrared measurements. Spectral results of a polypropylene face mask collected via diffuse reflection and attenuated total reflection (ATR) were compared.

Raman Spectroscopy as a Tool for Studying Polymer Phase Transitions

February 01, 2021

Application Notes: Molecular

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In this application note, we investigate the phase transitions occurring in polyethylene and nylon-6 using the Edinburgh Instruments RMS1000 Raman Microscope and a temperature stage.

Raman Imaging for the Analysis of Food Products

February 01, 2021

Application Notes Molecular

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Confocal Raman microscopy is a powerful tool for analyzing the chemical composition of samples on the submicrometer scale. In the food industry, various ingredients, additives, and bio-polymers (such as emulsifiers, stabilizers, carbohydrates, or thickeners) are commonly used to optimize the texture or the flavor of food. The distribution and microstructure of the ingredients strongly influence the properties of the final product. Therefore, research and development, as well as quality control, require powerful analytical tools for studying the distribution of compounds in food. Raman imaging has proven to be an effective and versatile technique for food analysis (1,2).

See-Through Measurements of Illicit Substances in Commercial Containers with the TacticID®-1064 ST

February 01, 2021

Application Notes: Molecular

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The TacticID-1064 ST has dedicated software and hardware designed to measure materials through both transparent and opaque containers. These through-barrier measurements remove the need for active sampling of potentially dangerous compounds such as fentanyl, leading to safer operations and reduced wait time for clear results. The 1064 nm laser is also an advantage for analyzing fluorescent or impure material. A Raman system with a 785 or 830 nm laser may generate fluorescence from these samples, which can overwhelm the Raman signal and make identification impossible. In this application note, we explore some of the capabilities of the TacticID-1064 ST.

Raman and Phase Shifting Interferometry (PSI) Study of Tear/Fold Structure on Transferred Graphene

February 01, 2021

Molecular Spectroscopy

36

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Supported by the PSI method, Raman spectroscopy has the capability to analyze the surface structure of nanomaterials, such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD), semiconductors, nanomaterials, and so on.

A Sampling Flexibility for Raman Spectroscopy

February 01, 2021

Application Notes: Molecular

36

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Key Issues: Sampling flexibility of Raman enables in-process analysis of solids, turbid media, liquids, and gases Large volumetric Raman provide representative sampling of heterogenous solids

Identifying Textiles with Extended-Range NIR Spectroscopy

February 01, 2021

Application Notes Molecular

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FT-NIR spectroscopy is a useful tool to identify textile samples, with distinct spectral features observed at wavelengths >1350 nm. This approach can be applied to authentication of natural and synthetic consumer textile products.

Diamond ATR-FTIR Study of Nitriles

February 01, 2021

Application Notes: Molecular

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Diamond ATR has become one of the most commonly used FT-IR spectroscopy methods. However, the strong diamond lattice bands in the 2300–1900 cm-1 region make it difficult to measure the functional groups from nitriles, isocyanates, isothiocyanates, diimides, azides, and ketenes that would normally appear in that region. This applications note compares the sensitivity of a single-reflection ATR to multiple-reflection ATR for the nitrile functional group infrared transition.

Microwave Digestion and Trace Metals Analysis of Mixed Cannabis and Hemp Products

February 01, 2021

Atomic Spectroscopy

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In 1970, marijuana was designated a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act, making it nearly impossible for laboratories to perform cannabis research. However, medicinal use of cannabis is now legal in Canada and 36 U.S. states, with more joining every year. With the passage of the Farm Bill in 2018, it is now federally legal to grow and process hemp in all 50 states. All of this interest in medical cannabis and CBD has highlighted the need for good analysis methodology in this relatively young market. Cannabis analysis is still developing standardized protocols, requirements, and acceptable testing practices. Typical testing requirements for cannabis and its products include heavy metal analysis, pesticide residue, and the potency of active ingredients such as tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The terpene content of cannabis is also important. Terpenes have been shown to have beneficial uses for treatment of conditions ranging from cancer and inflammation to anxiety and sleeplessness. It is believed that the combination of terpenes and cannabinoids in cannabis produce a synergistic effect with regard to medical benefits, further elevating its popularity worldwide.